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Middle School Library Research Guide   Tags: noodletools, notes, plagiarism, research, works cited  

Last Updated: Oct 12, 2011 URL: http://francisparker.libguides.com/content.php?pid=260596 Print Guide RSS Updates

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Middle School Handbook

The Middle School Handbook (p. 13) discusses the issue of plagiarism.

Plagiarism

In its broadest sense plagiarism occurs when a person presents the words or ideas of another as his or her work. Any form of plagiarism is an act of academic dishonesty. Although plagiarism is addressed and discussed in classes, it is the student's responsibility to know and to avoid all forms of plagiarism, including, but not limited to:

  • Copying any part of a story or an essay from a book, newspaper, magazine, or the Internet without crediting the author.
  • Using a paragraph, sentence, or even a phrase from another writer's work without giving proper credit.
  • Quoting the words of another person without using quotation marks and without giving proper credit.
  • Incorporating another person's unique idea into a paper without giving proper credit.
 

Intentional Plagiarism

According to the Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, the definition of plagiarize is "to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own without crediting the source."

This type of plagiarism is intentional and takes place when a student knowingly presents work as their own that has been taken from another source. In its most obvious form, students copy and paste information from the internet into a research assignment without crediting their source. At Parker, we assume that this type of plagiarism rarely happens. It is a very serious offense. It is a form of cheating. 

 

Accidental Plagiarism

Plagiarism can occur accidentally. This happens when you don't intend to plagiarize, but fail to cite sources correctly or copy too much of the source's original wording while trying to paraphrase or summarize from the source. Even when you summarize something in your own words, you must still cite the original source! It is assumed that as a Middle School student, you must learn from other scholars in your research.

Accidental plagiarism can be avoided by 

  • properly citing sources.
  • by taking careful notes.
  • by carefully keeping track of assignment expectations and due dates.
  • by practicing the technigues of quoting, paraphasing and summarizing.
Working carefully on assignments and taking the time to record your research sources at the time you start taking notes will give you the tools to avoid accidental plagiarism.
 

Citing Sources

We credit other people's work by citing the sources we use in research. We do this because we are members of a scholarly community that honors intellectual property rights, the fair exchange of ideas, and the progress of knowledge through this exchange.

Reasons why we cite our sources:

To behave ethically with regard to the intellectual property of others.

To help others refer to the sources used in your research.

To be clear about which ideas are your own.

To protect yourself from accidental plagiarism.


 

Noodle Tools

NoodleTools is a subscription research and bibliographic tool that allows you to create and organize citations, take notes and create outlines based on them

Please access our guide using the tab above to learn how you can use Noodle Tools to manage your research material.

What is a citation?

A "citation" is the way you tell your readers that certain material in your work came from another source. It also gives your readers the information necessary to find that source again, including:

  • information about the author
  • the title of the work
  • the name and location of the company that published the source
  • the date your source was published
  • the page numbers of the source material you are borrowing

In Middle School, you will usually include a "Works Cited" list at the end of any research project.










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